It’s that time of year again!

Yep! Sorry everyone, but if you’re thinking of having personalised Christmas cards, Christmas gifts or brochures etc for early 2017, you really need to be putting orders in in the next few weeks… November and December are very busy for printers and so normal turn-around times get stretched by demand.

So, if you’ve had an idea, but not done anything with it, please don’t leave it too much longer… and if it’s anything we can help with, please just give us a call.

Are mailshots dead?

This morning, the postman came. Which is not unusual.

What was unusual was that instead of only bills, unsolicited credit card application forms and catalogues we’ve never signed up for (Mail Preference Service?), it contained 3 things I was actually pleased to receive: a wristband for a conference I’ve been looking forward to for a year, free tickets for a balloted event and a mystery blue box that I’d had an email about. Plus another credit card application form–you can’t win ’em all!

The first two were things I had instigated. The third and fourth I hadn’t, although I had arranged some print from the third company last year. They regularly send me pens, post-its and notebooks, so I haven’t unsubscribed. This blue box was bigger than normal and contained a sports water bottle, insulated lunch bag, key ring beer bottle opener, a pen and a coaster. All were branded with their web address and had their item number printed on them, with a flyer telling you exactly how much each of the five items cost in various quantities. This is useful to designers who like to show samples to their clients—and printers know it.

Blue box from 4 Imprint
The box of goodies

The reason I’m telling you about this is simple: the stuff in the blue box is not going straight in the bin. The items were good enough quality and useful enough for school, for me to find them a home. The timing was right too—just as the temperature rises and we start to think ‘outdoorsy thoughts’. They also knew that—the enclosed letter said ‘Summer is approaching’.

So, useful, clever or targeted mailshots CAN still work—even if they don’t have a freebie enclosed! They just need to stand out and be appropriate to the target audience.

Of course, everyone likes something for nothing, but that’s really isn’t the whole story.
Nicely printed, lower print-run catalogues, leaflets and flyers on paper that feels and smells nice still get looked at and admired.

The recipient standing next to their recycling bin will say ‘no, actually, I’ll hold onto that one—you never know when we might need them’. That’s when mailshots work.

So, as we enter a new tax year, what ideas and/or messages could you share with your existing and potential clients and customers? If you need some help with forming your ideas and getting an idea of the cost, you know where we are.

Looking ahead

Well, we’re nearly half way through the Autumn term and Christmas is looming… (Sorry for the reminder, but if you’re thinking of digital or corporate Christmas cards, now is the time to be working on them…).

printing_press
A printing press!

This post is not just about thinking about Christmas cards though! When we meet clients about an upcoming project, we like to try to help plan ahead. It’s not because we want to ‘get more business’; it’s because a little bit of planning can save clients a lot of money and frustration…

If a marketing push is something you’re thinking of for next year, please read this example below of how a bit of joined up thinking and planning managed to save a client thousands of pounds. I should point out, that this principle applies to litho printing which is what we use for higher quality projects, print runs over 1000 and special finishes. Digital printing prices are more consistent and best for smaller print runs.

We had a briefing meeting for a large retail client’s 56 page in-store training manual. As employment law changes twice yearly, we recommended that instead of a booklet that could need to be binned every six months, it would be a good idea to have an A4 ring binder printed and laminated, with 8 sections containing the information needed on loose sheets. These could then be updated when necessary, but the bulk of the content could be kept.

When in a different part of the office for a staff newsletter editorial meeting, we just happened to be having a conversation with another representative of that company who was also looking to produce a manual, a couple of months down the line. With a bit of digging, we worked out that what they really needed was a similar folder with inserts. So, we all got together and hatched a plan!

To get the best prices on these folders there are order thresholds. We asked very nicely and a binder printer agreed to print 100 of 2 kinds of folder outer, but class them as one 200 run job on the binder-assembly bit. A threshold was reached, so unit price fell dramatically and our client was able to save thousands of pounds. As a larger business with annual budgets, they didn’t have the small business concern of having the money in the bank. But the principles are the same and perhaps the impact (and relief) is greater when it’s a sole trader who wants to print a series of leaflets.

Is this sort of planning something that could help you save money or raise the spec of your next print job?

What was that paper size again?

An illustration of the A series of paper sizes
The most common sizes of paper in Europe

Most of the time, when we do a print job, we work out the specifications based on the size of the finished job (A4, A3, A6 etc.). The reason for this is that paper is measured in standard sizes so everyone in the production process will know what they are working towards. When using, say an A5 reference, the printer knows to order the exact amount of paper to run a job without creating too much waste. Of course, you can have any sized job you like, but you may end up paying more for it.

How does this affect me?

Well, the vast majority of all printed materials are produced in one of the sizes above. The sheets of paper that run through the presses are in these proportions, so using a standard size minimises waste and makes it easier for a printer to plan the jobs on the press. This keeps the cost down and is much better for the environment too.

What can I do in future?

If you ask us to work on a print job for you, we can chat through your options and help you plan the job most effectively. We’ll also take into account things you may not have thought of, such as whether you want to keep your materials smaller than the ‘large letter’ format to save on postage, and best types of paper stock for the particular project you want to do.

An illustration of common envelope sizes
Common envelope sizes