Bungalow.

One of the really lovely things about running your own business is the fact that, to an extent, you can make your own hours and spend some quality time* with your family when others who work for THE MAN can’t.

So, with this in mind, I’d like to share with you an experience I had last week when I took my 4 year old daughter, Thalia, to her play school:

IMG_1628Picture the scene: A bright sunny morning, a little nip in the air, but the sort of day that makes you glad to be alive. From the moment Thalia left the house, she started to do her usual routine of looking everywhere, running about and asking questions. So. Many. Questions.

“Daddy, why is that leaf on the floor?” (Because it fell there).

“Daddy, what is that man doing?” (He’s sitting in the cab of his digger).

“Daddy, is that a car?” (Yes, Thalia. Yes, so is that one. No, that’s a bus).

“Daddy, can we get a doggy?” (No.)

“Daddy, why can’t we get a doggy?” (Your mummy is allergic, and I don’t want to clear up after one. I have enough of that with you and your sister. And your mummy, come to that.)

“Daddy, why do we have to look both ways when we cross a road?” (So we don’t get hit by a car.)

“Daddy, I really want a doggy. Pleeeeeassssse can we get a doggy?” (No.)

And so on. Anyway, at a certain part of the walk to school, we go down a road that has both houses and those dwellings that are only one storey tall. Thalia finds these inexplicably fascinating.

“Daddy, why are those houses so, um, small?”

“They’re not small, sweetie, they just only have one floor.”

“Oh. Why?”

“Well, because some people like houses that only have one floor. They are called Bungalows.”

“Bungas?”

“No, bungalows. It’s a funny word isn’t it?”

“Do those bungas have any stairs, Daddy?”

“No, sweetie. They only have one floor.”

“Why?”

“Well, as I said, some people like to have everything in their house on the same floor…”

“What, like their toilet and bed and TV and everything?”

“Well, yes. Sometimes older people and people who can’t get up and down stairs live in them.”

“Do those people have legs, Daddy?”

“Um, yeah, most of them I think.”

“Oh. I like bungas. Are those bluebells, Daddy?”

“Looks like it, sweetie. Aren’t they pretty?”

“Yes, daddy. Daddy?”

“Yes, sweetie?”

“Can we get a bunga? And a doggy?”

“No, sweetie.”

“Oh. Is that a bunga, Daddy?”

“Yes, sweetie.”

“Does it only have one floor?”

“Yes, sweetie.”

“Does a doggy live there, Daddy?”

“I have no idea, Thalia…”

“Can we get a doggy, Daddy? And some bluebells?”

And so on ad infinitum. I love these moments.

 

*I’m sorry for using this horrible phrase.

Brand New: New Logo for Facebook done In-house with Eric Olson

So Facebook have changed their logo. I’m withholding judgment until I see it actually in place. What do you think?

Please note that the red in the logo is simply there to show the differences between the old and the new logos. Please click through to the linked article below to see more.

Source: Brand New: New Logo for Facebook done In-house with Eric Olson

Bleed! Urgh! What’s that all about then?

A image with crop marks
A diagram showing how artwork that is to go to bleed is prepared for the printing press.

OK, so you’d like an A4 leaflet with a picture that goes right to the edge of the paper. To make that happen, the picture needs to go beyond where the paper will be trimmed (ie, a bit larger than A4). This means that when the paper is cut to size, the ink will go right to the edge. Content (image, text or simply colour) can be ‘bled’ off one or more edges.

How does this affect me?

If you were to ask us to create some artwork for you, and we are not organising the print on your behalf, we may ask you what the bleed and trim sizes are.

The trim size is the actual finished size (eg 210 x 297mm for an A4 job). The bleed size is the trim size plus the recommended bleed amount. If your printer has asked for a 5mm bleed, then the artwork will need to be 220 x 307mm to allow an extra 5mm on each edge.

What can I do in future?

If you are supplying images to us that you would like to bleed off the edge, please bear in mind that a few millimetres of that picture will be trimmed away. If you are sourcing your own print, we’ll need to know what bleed and trim size your printer requires.

If you’re asking us to provide you with artwork that you will print in your office or at home, please be aware that only specialist printers, or printers for home computers that are sold with ‘print to bleed’ capabilities are able to print to the edge of the page. If you don’t have one of these printers, it means that you will have an unprinted margin at the edge of every page, so we would need to make sure that the artwork was created with this in mind. We’re always happy to show you examples or chat it through over the phone if it’s something you’d like a better idea about.

How do I get my colours to stay the same?

Pantone swatches
This is a page from a Pantone swatch book. Designers and printers live by these books.

Traditional printing presses normally mix percentages of colours on 4 separate plates called CMYK (we’ve previously written a blog post about these) to arrive at the final colour. For most jobs, they are sufficient to produce enough accuracy in the final materials. However, where specific colours are a necessity, we suggest using a spot (or match) colour.

A spot colour is simply a specific ink that is premixed to a recipe, and that can be used either alone or in conjunction with other spot colours or CMYK inks. The print industry standard for pre-mixed inks is the Pantone Matching System (PMS) and there are over 1100 colours to choose from, including metallics like gold and bronze. Another use for spot inks is for adding special effects like UV varnishes or fluorescents.

How does this affect me?

Spot colours give you greater accuracy if specific colours are a must. Please bear in mind, however, that the addition of each spot colour may increase the overall cost of your job. Most clients limit spots to 2 or 3 colours, which are usually enough to accurately portray their company’s identity.

What can I do in future?

If you want to use spot inks for any reason, or have specific Pantone numbers from a previous job, it’s always a good idea to chat through how it will look and how other factors such as paper stock, matt or gloss lamination etc will affect it. We’re always happy to give our thoughts if you’d like to get in touch.

Why do colours change when I print?

RGB, CMYK and visible colour gamuts
The differences in the colours the human eye can see vs. the CMYK (print) and RGB (screens) colour gamuts

Firstly, you need to understand the difference between RGB and CMYK. RGB (Red-Green-Blue) is the colour system used on computer monitors, TV screens and digital cameras. It has the ability to show exactly 16,777,216 colours and as it is lit from behind, each colour is bright and vibrant. CMYK is used on printed material (a magazine or leaflet for example). Cyan (blue), Magenta (pink), Yellow and Black (the K stands for K colour) are used in varying quantities and can accurately portray anything from flesh tones to landscapes. CMYK has a far more limited colour gamut (range) than RGB.

How does this affect me?

You may find that the colours look different on a PDF proof that you have printed out to what you see on screen. There are many reasons for this, but the fundamental point is that the colours on screen will be much brighter and more vivid due to the difference between RGB and CMYK. In addition, the types of ink used in desktop printers may vary between manufacturers and are vastly different from the inks used on a printing press. Different papers and finishes will also change the way colours will look.

What can I do in future?

We always recommend a proof from the printer for any job where colour is an important factor. There are various types of proofs for colour matching and we will be writing a blog post on these in the near future. If you would like to chat through the differences and how they might affect you, we’re always on hand, even if you don’t have a definite project in mind.

 

Welcome!

It’s good to talk, as an old advertising campaign put it, and while there’s a countless number of blogs devoted to design out there, we wanted a space to have our say about the wide world of design. We thought about having a blog on Tumblr or Medium, and while we might well have a presence on both of those fine venues, we thought it would be more appropriate to have our own place on the internet alongside our main site.

We’ll be regularly pointing out stuff that excites us and makes us think, as well as sharing our own case studies and bits & bobs from the studio. It’ll be informative, interesting and eclectic, and never, ever boring.