An interesting encounter

waves_smallA little while back, I was at a Friday lunchtime business networking event (which just happened to be in a ‘licensed establishment’). At the end of the event, a slightly surreal thing happened that relates nicely to my thoughts on how reputation and branding are not just about a logo.

There were just two of us left finishing our coffees, when a man who had been sitting at a table for about an hour and a half approached us. He asked if we were part of the business group, which we said we were. He then proceeded to ask us for some advice on how to promote his business. Now, as you can imagine, we regularly get asked ‘what we think’ of a website, design, logo, or other marketing collateral, but his was slightly unusual and it was quite difficult to know what to say…

This chap produced a tiny piece of photocopier paper, maybe half the size of a business card, on which he had typed his name and mobile number; he had cut it out roughly with a pair of scissors. There was no email address or web address for his ‘Man and Van Removal Service’. It’s probably now time to mention too that we had seen him and his friend steadily consume several beers and whiskys during the previous hour or so. Even though he was slurring his words, he seemed genuinely baffled as to why business was slow.

So, what can you do or say? The best answer we could come up with was to make a few general suggestions and wish him luck with his venture. We were in a much bigger dilemma though when we saw him outside getting his keys from his pocket to drive off…

The moral of the story: A good brand is not solely about ‘a nice business card’. People buy from people they can trust and brand reputation flows through everything you do.

Are mailshots dead?

This morning, the postman came. Which is not unusual.

What was unusual was that instead of only bills, unsolicited credit card application forms and catalogues we’ve never signed up for (Mail Preference Service?), it contained 3 things I was actually pleased to receive: a wristband for a conference I’ve been looking forward to for a year, free tickets for a balloted event and a mystery blue box that I’d had an email about. Plus another credit card application form–you can’t win ’em all!

The first two were things I had instigated. The third and fourth I hadn’t, although I had arranged some print from the third company last year. They regularly send me pens, post-its and notebooks, so I haven’t unsubscribed. This blue box was bigger than normal and contained a sports water bottle, insulated lunch bag, key ring beer bottle opener, a pen and a coaster. All were branded with their web address and had their item number printed on them, with a flyer telling you exactly how much each of the five items cost in various quantities. This is useful to designers who like to show samples to their clients—and printers know it.

Blue box from 4 Imprint
The box of goodies

The reason I’m telling you about this is simple: the stuff in the blue box is not going straight in the bin. The items were good enough quality and useful enough for school, for me to find them a home. The timing was right too—just as the temperature rises and we start to think ‘outdoorsy thoughts’. They also knew that—the enclosed letter said ‘Summer is approaching’.

So, useful, clever or targeted mailshots CAN still work—even if they don’t have a freebie enclosed! They just need to stand out and be appropriate to the target audience.

Of course, everyone likes something for nothing, but that’s really isn’t the whole story.
Nicely printed, lower print-run catalogues, leaflets and flyers on paper that feels and smells nice still get looked at and admired.

The recipient standing next to their recycling bin will say ‘no, actually, I’ll hold onto that one—you never know when we might need them’. That’s when mailshots work.

So, as we enter a new tax year, what ideas and/or messages could you share with your existing and potential clients and customers? If you need some help with forming your ideas and getting an idea of the cost, you know where we are.